28th NATIONAL Homeless Persons Interfaith Memorial Service December 21, 2017. Church on the Hill, 140 Bowdoin Street ~ Beacon Hill, Boston, MA 02108

28th NATIONAL Homeless Persons Interfaith Memorial Service December 21, 2017. Church on the Hill, 140 Bowdoin Street ~ Beacon Hill, Boston, MA 02108

HOMELESS PERSONS’ MEMORIAL DAY DECEMBER 21, 2017 “THE LONGEST NIGHT OF THE YEAR TO BE WITHOUT A HOME.”

  • Posted on: 19 December 2017
  • By: HRASHID

28th NATIONAL Homeless Persons Interfaith Memorial Service December 21, 2017. Church on the Hill, 140 Bowdoin Street ~ Beacon Hill, Boston, MA 02108

12:00 PM

HOMELESS PERSONS’ MEMORIAL DAY DECEMBER 21, 2017 “THE LONGEST NIGHT OF THE YEAR TO BE WITHOUT A HOME”
Housed and un-housed people are all invited to celebrate and memorialize those we have lost in the past year. We will do this in music, prayer and stories as we read the names of all our marginalized neighbors we have lost to the streets. All faith traditions are encouraged to attend and faith leaders are asked to attire according to their tradition. A light meal will follow at 1:00 PM For more Information contact Michael Bancewicz @ 617-523-4575 ~ moxie12794@aol.com

National Health Care for the Homeless Council,P.O. Box 60427, Nashville, TN 37206 - 0427, 615) 226,2292,www.nhchc.org
Pray for the Dead and Fight like Hell for the Living: Honoring Homeless Person’s Memorial Day - December 21st Recently, there has been greater attention to overt acts of violence perpetrated through mass shootings, police,brutality, and growing incidents of homicide.
We are shocked by these blatant acts of violence, yet there is another – more pervasive – form of violence in our communities: poverty. Unfortunately, we have become so accustomed to deep and desperate poverty; it no longer inspires the same distress as the discrete acts of violence that too often make the headlines. Of the 46 million people living in poverty in the U.S., too many suffer the ultimate consequences of our collective failure to acknowledge and address the brutal conditions of deprivation. Those who are so poor that they
experience homelessness are three to four times more likely to die prematurely and have a life expectancy 30 years shorter than their housed counterparts.

On National Homeless Persons’ Memorial Day (HPMD) –commemorated annually since 1990 on or about December 21, the first day of winter and longest night of the year – communities across the country come together to remember those who have died without stable housing, to reflect on the shocking inhumanity of homelessness, and to call for meaningful policy changes to ensure that no life is lived or lost in homelessness. Each HPMD event is unique to its community, but the commemorations often include reading of names, candles, prayers, personal remembrances, marches, and moments of silence.

Recently, the State of Hawaii and nine local jurisdictions declared a state of emergency around homelessness. These declarations provide us the opportunity to acknowledge that homelessness is a human
- made disaster that has been at crisis levels for decades; and is one we have the tools to end if we can galvanize the political will needed for significant policy changes. Any solution to end homelessness must be grounded in greater access to affordable housing and
supportive services to help individuals not only meet their basic needs, but thrive in their community.

Communities holding HPMD events should contact Katherine Cavanaugh, National Consumer Advocate, at kcavanaugh@nhchc.org with information and photos about their event so the National HCH Council can better track events nationally. Our HPMD tool kit is available with resources to help communities plan events and better advocate for needed policy changes.Today, take pause with us to remember those who have lost their lives, and recommit ourselves to addressing the root causes of homelessness. Let us clearly state together that no person should die for lack of housing. National Health Care for the Homeless Council P.O. Box 60427, Nashville, TN 37206 -0427 (615) 226 -2292, www.nhchc.org

Advocacy Recommendations for Homeless Person’s Memorial Day 2017:
While Homeless Persons’ Memorial Day is a solemn occasion to remember those who have passed, we recommend that local groups conducting HPMD events use these opportunities to encourage changes in their community to prevent and end homelessness so that no others should die on the streets. Consider including in public statements some or all of the following policy priorities, or add others depending on local issues currently active:

1. Housing is a fundamental need, a basic human right, and protects people from illness, violence and death. Local, state and federal governments should invest in affordable housing for all its residents, to include those at the lowest income levels. Adequate supports to maintain housing (through a Housing First approach) should be available to those who need them in order to prevent homelessness.

2. State and local jurisdictions should declare formal States of Emergency to create additional resources for housing and services as well as more quickly facilitate zoning changes and other administrative actions needed to end homelessness.

3. Medical illnesses often go untreated for lack of accessible, affordable health care, and result in accelerated death rates and premature mortality for people without homes. States that have not yet expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act must do so in order to facilitate the breadth of health care services for this population (who are often uninsured). States and the federal governments should move toward single payer health care financing – expanded and improved Medicare for all – to eliminate remaining coverage gaps and financial barriers.

4. Alcohol - related illnesses and drug overdoses are among the leading causes of death for people experiencing homelessness. States and local communities should ensure there is adequate capacity to provide substance abuse treatment for those who need it, to include intensive, residential programs Harm reduction programs –i ncluding ready availability of naloxone, needle exchange, and safe injection sites – should be implemented.

5. People without homes are frequent victims of violence, which is sometimes fatal. Jurisdictions should not pass laws that criminalize homelessness because arrests and displacement do nothing to solve the problem. Law enforcement should focus on protecting vulnerable people, rather than on enforcing ordinances intended to limit their presence in public spaces.

6. Local jurisdictions should track, investigate and provide annual reports on all homeless deaths, and use the information to improve public policies and targeted interventions. Death certificates should identify people who die while experiencing homelessness to provide better data on the extent of these tragedies. National Health Care for the Homeless Council P.O. Box 60427, Nashville, TN 37206 -0427 (615) 226 -2292, www.nhchc.org

http://files.constantcontact.com/c5a9b44a001/ea839915-25c7-4335-8469-7fb...
http://nationalhomeless.org/about-us/projects/memorial-day/
http://volunteer.uwncm.org/event/detail/?event_id=41963
https://www.census.gov/newsroom/stories/2017/december/homeless-persons.html
https://www.nhchc.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/hpmd-public-statement-a...

AttachmentSize
PDF icon 28.pdf75.83 KB
PDF icon hpmd-public-statement-and-advocacy-agenda.pdf225.39 KB